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Number sequence progression


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Last updated 10 January 2013 11:06 by NZTecAdmin

The number sequence progression describes the sequences of numbers that learners need to understand in order to solve problems. The earliest step on the progression involves numbers from 0 to 20. At the highest step, learners know the sequences of integers, decimals, fractions and percentages.

Most adults will be able to:
Activities
1.
  • the sequence of numbers, forwards and backwards, to at least 20.

Learners can count forwards and backwards, in order, to at least 20. They know where numbers come in sequence, for example, a learner knows that the number after 16 is 17 and that the number before 16 is 15.

 
  • the sequence of numbers, forwards and backwards, to at least 20.
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2.
  • the sequence of numbers, forwards and backwards, to at least 100
  • how to skip-count in twos, fives and tens to 100.

Learners can count backwards and forwards to at least 100. They know where numbers come in sequence, for example, a learner knows that the number 38 comes after 37 and before 39.

Learners can count forwards in twos, fives and tens (skip-counting) to 100.

Numbers to 100

Learners order, read and write numbers to 100.

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3.
  • the sequence of numbers, forwards and backwards, to at least 1,000
  • the number that is 1, 10 and 100 before or after a given number in the range 0–1,000
  • how to skip-count in twos, threes, fives and tens to 1,000
  • how to order fractions with like denominators.

Learners know the sequence of numbers, forwards and backwards, to at least 1,000. They know where numbers come in sequence, using tens and hundreds as guides. For example, a learner knows that 473 comes before 528 because there are five hundreds in 528 and only four in 473. They know that 382 is ten more than 372 and ten less than 392. Learners can skip-count in twos, threes, fives and tens, for example, 113, 116, 119, 121.

Learners know that the denominator indicates the number of equal parts a whole is divided into and that the numerator is the number of those parts.

Learners can order fractions that have the same denominator (such as 1/5 , 2/5 , 3/5 , … 31/5).

Understanding fractions 1

Learners develop an understanding of fractions by cutting, naming and ordering strips of paper.

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4.
  • the sequence of numbers, forwards and backwards, by ones, tens, hundreds and thousands, to a million
  • how to give the number 1, 10, 100 or 1,000 before or after a given number in the range 0–1,000,000
  • the sequence of decimal numbers in tenths and hundredths
  • how to order unit fractions.

Learners know the sequence of numbers and can count using ones, tens, hundreds and thousands, up to a million. For example, 10,000, 20,000, 30,000 ….

Learners know the numbers that come before and after any given number, using ones, tens and thousands. For example, a learner knows that 3,904 comes after 3,812 and before 4,132 and that 242,500 comes after 141,400 and before 343,200. They can place numbers up to 1,000,000 in order.

Learners know the sequence of decimal numbers, for example, that 5.304 comes after 5.204 and before 5.404.

Learners can order unit fractions (fractions that have 1 as the numerator, such as 1/5 , 1/4 , 1/3 , 1/2).

Understanding fractions 3

Learners develop their understanding of fractions by cutting and sharing strips of paper.

Understanding fractions 2

Learners order unit fractions using strips of paper.

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5.
  • the sequences of integers, fractions, decimals and percentages, forwards and backwards, from any given number.

Learners know the sequences of integers, decimals, fractions and percentages and can order these from any given number. For example:

  • 1.376, 1.377, 1.378
  • 3.387, 3.4, 3.418, 3.42
  • 3/8 , 1/2 , 2/3 , 3.4
  • 10%, 0.45, 0.759, 80%.
 
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