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Correlations with the reading and writing progressions


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Last updated 26 October 2012 15:28 by NZTecAdmin

The following chart shows the first step of each of the reading and writing progressions. With each step it shows the relationship to the starting points that can be used either prior to working at that step or to support work in the step.

Learners can work within the first step of several of the reading progressions (Vocabulary, Language and Text Features, Comprehension, Reading Critically) without needing to draw on decoding. If they are not able to decode words, learners will be severely hampered in moving on in these progressions.

Learners can work on the first step of most of the writing progressions as they start to develop the skills for writing words and phrases.

Read with Understanding

Progression

Most adults will :

Starting Points:

Rationale

Decoding
  • have a bank of sight words (words they recognise automatically)
  • use a few reliable strategies for decoding regularly and irregularly spelt everyday words in short, simple texts.
  • phonological awareness
  • sound–letter relationships
  • environmental print
  • high-interest words
  • print and word concepts.
Represent essential precursor skills or knowledge.
Vocabulary
  • have a reading vocabulary of everyday words, signs and symbols.
  • listening vocabulary
  • environmental print
  • high-interest words.
Represent essential precursor skills or knowledge.
Language and Text Features
  • understand that groups of words work together in meaningful units.
  • print and word concepts
  • environmental print.
Represent essential precursor skills or knowledge.
Comprehension
  • have some awareness of their purpose for reading
  • expect that texts will make sense
  • use strategies to read short, simple texts with support.
  Learners can work at some aspects of this step.
Reading Critically
  • have some awareness of the different purposes of visual and written texts
  • be aware that all readers and all writers have a perspective (point of view).
  Learners can work at this step.

Write to Communicate

Progression

Most adults will :

Starting Points:

Rationale

Purpose and Audience
  • have a simple purpose for writing, with one or more goals related to the text content (what the text will say).
  Learners can work at some aspects of this step.
Spelling
  • have a bank of high-frequency words they can write automatically and accurately
  • have in their spelling bank high-frequency words that have regular spelling patterns and irregular spelling patterns.
  • phonological awareness
  • sound–letter relationships
  • letter formation
  • environmental print
  • high-interest words
  • listening vocabulary
  • print and word concepts.
Represent essential precursor skills or knowledge.
Vocabulary
  • use a range of everyday, highly familiar words and phrases to write simple texts.
  • listening vocabulary
  • environmental print
  • high-interest words.
Represent essential precursor skills or knowledge.
Language and Text Features      
Planning and Composing
  • write single words and simple phrases to convey information in a readable draft
  • use a highly structured template or model to write a simple text on a very familiar topic.
  • letter formation
  • high-interest words
  • print and word concepts.
Represent essential skills or knowledge, but learners can work at this step as they begin to write words and phrases.
Revising and Editing
  • use basic revision strategies, with support, to edit their writing in response to feedback.
  • letter formation
  • high-interest words.
Learners can work at this step as they begin to write words and phrases.

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