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Speak: Using Strategies to Communicate progression


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Last updated 10 January 2013 11:33 by NZTecAdmin

Speakers use strategies to communicate information and ideas effectively. These strategies include selecting information, ideas and thoughts, choosing to use particular words or details and using non-verbal features (which include pace, intonation, stress and body language).

Most adults will be able to:
Activities
1.
  • communicate information and thoughts in familiar, predictable situations.

Speakers communicate information and thoughts in familiar, predictable contexts by using simple strategies (for example, using formulaic phrases and questions, responding to simple questions and combining familiar words and phrases).

Elaborating

Learners explore ways in which they can add precision, interest and clarity to their speech.

Taking turns

Learners explore the many ways in which participants in a conversation give and use cues for taking turns.

  • communicate information and thoughts in familiar, predictable situations.
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2.
  • select and communicate information, ideas and thoughts, using appropriate words and phrases with some fluency on very familiar topics
  • monitor and modify speech to improve the clarity and effectiveness of the communication.

Speakers communicate information, ideas and thoughts in meaningful interactions. They may do this (for example, in response to questions) by combining and recombining short known words or phrases. They also use their prior knowledge and experiences to help them make decisions about how to communicate. Areas of study can include:

  • combining words and phrases, for example, “Thanks for asking. I can’t tell you right now.”
  • extending communication, for example, “His moko have been very sick, that’s why he couldn’t come last night. He’d like to come next time though.”
  • finding ways to adapt speech for various familiar situations, for example, using shorter, clearer sentences when the listener is learning English: “This is where you sleep. You wash in here. We eat in here.”

Asking questions

Learners to identify some specific situations in which they wish to improve their questioning skills, using listening and speaking.

Elaborating

Learners explore ways in which they can add precision, interest and clarity to their speech.

Retelling, summarising

Learners select the most important ideas or information and retell them in a coherent way so that a listener can get the gist of the story or event that is being retold.

Taking turns

Learners explore the many ways in which participants in a conversation give and use cues for taking turns.

Using formal and informal language

Learners are taught to be aware of different kinds of talk and how they can adjust and adapt their speaking to match audience, purpose and context.

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3.
  • select and communicate information, ideas and thoughts, using appropriate vocabulary, expressions and grammar fluently and coherently on less familiar topics
  • use appropriate gestures, tone, pace and intonation to improve communication.

Speakers communicate information, ideas and thoughts on less familiar topics and in less familiar situations. They use prior knowledge to determine appropriate gestures, tone, pace and intonation. Speakers monitor and modify their communications. Areas of study can include:

  • discussing the use of gestures, tone, pace and intonation
  • reformulating ideas into effective communications
  • meeting communication challenges in unfamiliar or stressful situations.

Asking questions

Learners to identify some specific situations in which they wish to improve their questioning skills, using listening and speaking.

Elaborating

Learners explore ways in which they can add precision, interest and clarity to their speech.

Listening and discussing

Learners develop their ability to listen for meaning and to demonstrate understanding through discussion. This also involves critical and interactive skills.

Retelling, summarising

Learners select the most important ideas or information and retell them in a coherent way so that a listener can get the gist of the story or event that is being retold.

Taking turns

Learners explore the many ways in which participants in a conversation give and use cues for taking turns.

Using formal and informal language

Learners are taught to be aware of different kinds of talk and how they can adjust and adapt their speaking to match audience, purpose and context.

Using notes to speak

Learners are taught strategies they can use as they prepare to speak on a topic.

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4.
  • use a range of strategies to select, organise and communicate information, ideas and thoughts in extended discourse on a range of unfamiliar topics in a variety of contexts
  • monitor and modify speech to clarify or obscure a particular point of view, attitude, bias or agenda.

Speakers communicate fuently and coherently, using a wide range of vocabulary related to their work, personal, community, social and academic contexts. They select words and expressions that are appropriate to the context and refect their own style or voice. Speakers communicate in meaningful interactions, using coherent, reasoned and complex discourse. They can sustain communication on a range of topics, elaborating their ideas with signifcant detail and examples. They use strategies to monitor and modify their speech in order to clarify or obscure a particular point of view, attitude, bias or agenda. Speakers make conscious and deliberate decisions about the content and organisation of their discourse.

Areas of study can include:

  • selecting and organising information to meet the needs of a particular audience
  • establishing rapport with an audience, for example, by including interest, humour or personal stories in speech.

Listening and discussing

Learners develop their ability to listen for meaning and to demonstrate understanding through discussion. This also involves critical and interactive skills.

Retelling, summarising

Learners select the most important ideas or information and retell them in a coherent way so that a listener can get the gist of the story or event that is being retold.

Taking turns

Learners explore the many ways in which participants in a conversation give and use cues for taking turns.

Using formal and informal language

Learners are taught to be aware of different kinds of talk and how they can adjust and adapt their speaking to match audience, purpose and context.

Using notes to speak

Learners are taught strategies they can use as they prepare to speak on a topic.

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