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Speak: Vocabulary progression


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Last updated 10 January 2013 11:32 by NZTecAdmin

To communicate effectively, speakers need to know the meanings of the words (vocabulary) they use. They need to understand the forms and functions of these words, how they are used in sentences and how the words relate to one another. They need to be able to select words and phrases appropriate to the speaking situation.

Most adults will be able to:
Activities
1.
  • use a range of words, formulaic expressions and familiar phrases related to everyday topics and personal experiences.

Speakers use a range of appropriate formulaic expressions and limited vocabulary related to common, everyday topics and personal experiences. Areas of study can include:

  • building a repertoire of useful words, expressions and phrases
  • using appropriate words and expressions for making or responding to simple requests.

Greeting, meeting and parting

Learners make choices and practise commonly-used ways of greeting, introducing and farewelling people. Customary practices such as whaikorero can also be included in this scope.

Elaborating

Learners explore ways in which they can add precision, interest and clarity to their speech.

Taking turns

Learners explore the many ways in which participants in a conversation give and use cues for taking turns.

Using formal and informal language

Learners are taught to be aware of different kinds of talk and how they can adjust and adapt their speaking to match audience, purpose and context.

Using signpost words (discourse markers)

Learners explore the words (discourse markers) used to indicate different parts of a spoken text.

Verb tenses

Learners identify areas of confusion and are taught simple rules and exceptions about tenses.

  • use a range of words, formulaic expressions and familiar phrases related to everyday topics and personal experiences.
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2.
  • have a limited vocabulary that includes words and phrases related to common, everyday topics and personal experiences
  • choose appropriate vocabulary (including polite forms of words and expressions) for different contexts and audiences.

Speakers use a limited vocabulary to communicate in meaningful speech. They are becoming aware of how to use a few colloquial expressions in which words take on different meanings (such as “Hang on!”; “Give me a hand”; “Do you want a handle [of beer]?”). Areas of study can include:

  • constructing plurals
  • deciding how to greet and introduce people in different situations.

Greeting, meeting and parting

Learners make choices and practise commonly-used ways of greeting, introducing and farewelling people. Customary practices such as whaikorero can also be included in this scope.

Elaborating

Learners explore ways in which they can add precision, interest and clarity to their speech.

Listening for vocabulary

Learners are taught to listen for specific words, using strategies such as prior knowledge and the context to work out the meanings of these words.

Taking turns

Learners explore the many ways in which participants in a conversation give and use cues for taking turns.

Using formal and informal language

Learners are taught to be aware of different kinds of talk and how they can adjust and adapt their speaking to match audience, purpose and context.

Using signpost words (discourse markers)

Learners explore the words (discourse markers) used to indicate different parts of a spoken text.

Verb tenses

Learners identify areas of confusion and are taught simple rules and exceptions about tenses.

Collapse
3.
  • have an extended vocabulary that relates to familiar topics and personal experiences
  • have a knowledge of the collocations (words that commonly go together) of many words
  • be able to use some words and phrases with figurative as well as literal meanings
  • choose appropriate vocabulary for different contexts and audiences.

Speakers use an extended vocabulary, including words related to common, everyday topics and personal experiences. Areas of study can include:

  • extending vocabulary from familiar to less familiar words and expressions
  • learning collocations such as bright red, ride a bike, drive a car and sick and tired
  • discussing specific words in terms of their denotations (the use of a word to name a defined thing, for example, pig meaning a specific kind of animal) and connotations (the common associations of a word, for example, the word pig may have connotations of dirty and greedy).

Elaborating

Learners explore ways in which they can add precision, interest and clarity to their speech.

Listening for vocabulary

Learners are taught to listen for specific words, using strategies such as prior knowledge and the context to work out the meanings of these words.

Recognising the impact of words

Learners explore the ways in which words work together to develop an understanding of collocations, denotations and connotations.

Taking turns

Learners explore the many ways in which participants in a conversation give and use cues for taking turns.

Using formal and informal language

Learners are taught to be aware of different kinds of talk and how they can adjust and adapt their speaking to match audience, purpose and context.

Using notes to speak

Learners are taught strategies they can use as they prepare to speak on a topic.

Using signpost words (discourse markers)

Learners explore the words (discourse markers) used to indicate different parts of a spoken text.

Collapse
4.
  • have an extended vocabulary that includes some general academic and some specialised words.

Speakers extend their vocabulary to include more specialised words, such as those they may use in an academic or work setting. They are confident about using colloquial and figurative language appropriately. Areas of study include:

  • building up a repertoire of specialised words and phrases relevant to the contexts in which they work.

Listening for vocabulary

Learners are taught to listen for specific words, using strategies such as prior knowledge and the context to work out the meanings of these words.

Recognising the impact of words

Learners explore the ways in which words work together to develop an understanding of collocations, denotations and connotations.

Using formal and informal language

Learners are taught to be aware of different kinds of talk and how they can adjust and adapt their speaking to match audience, purpose and context.

Using notes to speak

Learners are taught strategies they can use as they prepare to speak on a topic.

Using signpost words (discourse markers)

Learners explore the words (discourse markers) used to indicate different parts of a spoken text.

Collapse
5.
  • have an extended vocabulary that includes words related to work, personal, community, social and academic contexts.

Speakers communicate fluently and coherently, using a wide range of vocabulary related to their work, personal, community, social and academic contexts. They select words and expressions that are appropriate to the context and reflect their own style or voice. Speakers reflect critically on their choice of vocabulary. Areas of study can include:

  • using words and expressions to convey voice (for example, “I grabbed some kai” instead of “I had lunch”.)
  • analysing recorded oral texts to identify and reflect on specific vocabulary choices.

Using notes to speak

Learners are taught strategies they can use as they prepare to speak on a topic.

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