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Listen: Language and Text Features progression


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Last updated 10 January 2013 11:28 by NZTecAdmin

To listen with understanding, listeners use their knowledge of language features and the features of connected discourse in English. Features of connected discourse include the different parts of the discourse and the ways in which parts are connected, for example, by the use of words (discourse markers) that signal a sequence. This progression also includes the features of speech that relate to the speaker’s pace and intonation and to how the speaker may stress certain words or sounds.

Most adults will be able to:
Activities
1.
  • understand short conversations and other simple spoken language that uses formulaic expressions and simple structures.

Listeners recognise simple language forms including some formulaic expressions, such as those used for questions (“What is your name?”; “Can I help you?”; “Can I take a message?”) and for instructions (“Write your iwi here.”; “Pass me the hammer.”). Areas of study can include:

  • extending the repertoire of formulaic expressions that learners understand
  • listening for and discussing commonly-used expressions.

Greeting, meeting and parting

Learners make choices and practise commonly-used ways of greeting, introducing and farewelling people. Customary practices such as whaikorero can also be included in this scope.

Taking turns

Learners explore the many ways in which participants in a conversation give and use cues for taking turns.

Using signpost words (discourse markers)

Learners explore the words (discourse markers) used to indicate different parts of a spoken text.

Verb tenses

Learners identify areas of confusion and are taught simple rules and exceptions about tenses.

  • understand short conversations and other simple spoken language that uses formulaic expressions and simple structures.
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2.
  • understand spoken conversations and other simple spoken language that uses some complex structures
  • understand spoken conversations and other simple spoken language even when the speakers pause, repeat themselves, or make false starts.

Listeners can recognise and understand simple sentences used in conversations and other connected discourse. Listeners understand the language features used by speakers in giving oral instructions (for example, imperative verbs such as “Speak up!”) or in describing a simple process (for example, discourse markers such as first, then and next). They can sustain their understanding of speech that includes repetition, pauses and false starts. Areas of study can include:

  • practising following simple verbal sequenced instructions (for example, repeating a verbal message, carrying out an unfamiliar but simple task from clear spoken instructions)
  • practising (in role plays) listening to a speaker who uses repetition, pauses and false starts (for example, “I’m sorry to say … well, I mean … the fact is that …”).

Greeting, meeting and parting

Learners make choices and practise commonly-used ways of greeting, introducing and farewelling people. Customary practices such as whaikorero can also be included in this scope.

Building on prior knowledge

Learners use prior knowledge before, during and after listening to help them focus on and understand the talk.

Listening for details

Learners listen for details in specific situations (such as passing on messages), and communicate those details to others.

Retelling, summarising

Learners select the most important ideas or information and retell them in a coherent way so that a listener can get the gist of the story or event that is being retold.

Sequencing a process

Learners are taught strategies to get the gist as they listen and to determine the order or sequence of steps in a process.

Taking turns

Learners explore the many ways in which participants in a conversation give and use cues for taking turns.

Using signpost words (discourse markers)

Learners explore the words (discourse markers) used to indicate different parts of a spoken text.

Verb tenses

Learners identify areas of confusion and are taught simple rules and exceptions about tenses.

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4.
  • understand more complex spoken conversations and other simple discourse including some less-familiar oral text types
  • recognise the language features used to establish coherence in such discourse.

Listeners understand the more complex grammatical constructions used in more formal oral text types such as extensive verbal reports. They are able to use their knowledge of how language works (for example, the use of discourse markers) to follow and understand the main points in connected discourse. Listeners in face-to-face settings can interpret the meanings of changes in a speaker’s pitch, pace and tone. Areas of study can include:

  • listening to and discussing the ways in which a speaker uses discourse markers such as “On the one hand … on the other hand”; “Therefore, I …”; “And finally before I go …” to help the listener follow a complex report
  • listening to a speaker (for example, on the marae, in a formal meeting, or in a television interview) to observe and later discuss the speaker’s use of pitch, pace, tone and body language.

Building on prior knowledge

Learners use prior knowledge before, during and after listening to help them focus on and understand the talk.

Listening and discussing

Learners develop their ability to listen for meaning and to demonstrate understanding through discussion. This also involves critical and interactive skills.

Listening for details

Learners listen for details in specific situations (such as passing on messages), and communicate those details to others.

Retelling, summarising

Learners select the most important ideas or information and retell them in a coherent way so that a listener can get the gist of the story or event that is being retold.

Sequencing a process

Learners are taught strategies to get the gist as they listen and to determine the order or sequence of steps in a process.

Taking turns

Learners explore the many ways in which participants in a conversation give and use cues for taking turns.

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6.
  • recognise language features in complex extended discourse and understand the ways in which speakers use these features to achieve a purpose.

Listeners recognise and understand language features in complex, extended discourse whether there is one speaker, two speakers or several speakers. More complex types of discussion include arguments, community meetings and formal interviews.

Building on prior knowledge

Learners use prior knowledge before, during and after listening to help them focus on and understand the talk.

Listening and discussing

Learners develop their ability to listen for meaning and to demonstrate understanding through discussion. This also involves critical and interactive skills.

Retelling, summarising

Learners select the most important ideas or information and retell them in a coherent way so that a listener can get the gist of the story or event that is being retold.

Sequencing a process

Learners are taught strategies to get the gist as they listen and to determine the order or sequence of steps in a process.

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