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Listen: Vocabulary progression


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Last updated 10 January 2013 11:29 by NZTecAdmin

To listen with understanding in English, listeners need to know the meanings of the words (vocabulary) that they hear. They need to understand the forms and functions of these words, how they are used in sentences and how words relate to one another.

Most adults will be able to:
Activities
1.
  • have a listening vocabulary of common nouns, verbs and familiar phrases they understand
  • identify words and phrases in running speech.

Listeners have a vocabulary of common nouns, verbs and familiar phrases they can identify in meaningful communication contexts, such as brief social meetings. Areas of study can include:

  • distinguishing individual words and phrases in speech and talking about their meanings
  • listening for key words and phrases. These may include formulaic phrases (phrases that follow a set formula or pattern) such as, “How are you?” or “Next, please.”

Greeting, meeting and parting

Learners make choices and practise commonly-used ways of greeting, introducing and farewelling people. Customary practices such as whaikorero can also be included in this scope.

Taking turns

Learners explore the many ways in which participants in a conversation give and use cues for taking turns.

Using signpost words (discourse markers)

Learners explore the words (discourse markers) used to indicate different parts of a spoken text.

Verb tenses

Learners identify areas of confusion and are taught simple rules and exceptions about tenses.

  • have a listening vocabulary of common nouns, verbs and familiar phrases they understand
  • identify words and phrases in running speech.
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2.
  • identify words and phrases and understand many of the words in fast speech
  • be aware that many words may have more than one meaning and notice when a word is used with an unfamiliar meaning.

Listeners understand everyday vocabulary in words and phrases spoken quickly, including the vocabulary used in simple questions and statements that convey requests, instructions, greetings and short explanations. They understand that many words have two or more meanings and seek to identify the new meaning of a familiar word used in an unfamiliar way. Areas of study can include:

  • listening for words and phrases that signal questions and requests
  • listening for words and phrases in fast speech
  • discussing words, such as power, hot, kiwi and book, that have two or more meanings.

Greeting, meeting and parting

Learners make choices and practise commonly-used ways of greeting, introducing and farewelling people. Customary practices such as whaikorero can also be included in this scope.

Listening for details

Learners listen for details in specific situations (such as passing on messages), and communicate those details to others.

Listening for vocabulary

Learners are taught to listen for specific words, using strategies such as prior knowledge and the context to work out the meanings of these words.

Taking turns

Learners explore the many ways in which participants in a conversation give and use cues for taking turns.

Using signpost words (discourse markers)

Learners explore the words (discourse markers) used to indicate different parts of a spoken text.

Verb tenses

Learners identify areas of confusion and are taught simple rules and exceptions about tenses.

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3.
  • have a listening vocabulary of everyday words and some less common words
  • understand when a speaker uses simple figurative language, such as metaphor, symbolism or irony, for effect
  • identify the connotations (common associations) of familiar words.

Listeners understand everyday words and phrases and some that are less common. Areas of study can include:

  • extending vocabulary to include words and phrases related to work, community, or academic topics
  • analysing words and phrases that are meant figuratively rather than literally, for example, “I heard through the kumara vine that you were sick”
  • discussing the different connotations of some words that have similar meanings, for example, house, home and marae.

Building on prior knowledge

Learners use prior knowledge before, during and after listening to help them focus on and understand the talk.

Listening for details

Learners listen for details in specific situations (such as passing on messages), and communicate those details to others.

Listening for vocabulary

Learners are taught to listen for specific words, using strategies such as prior knowledge and the context to work out the meanings of these words.

Recognising the impact of words

Learners explore the ways in which words work together to develop an understanding of collocations, denotations and connotations.

Sequencing a process

Learners are taught strategies to get the gist as they listen and to determine the order or sequence of steps in a process.

Taking turns

Learners explore the many ways in which participants in a conversation give and use cues for taking turns.

Using signpost words (discourse markers)

Learners explore the words (discourse markers) used to indicate different parts of a spoken text.

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4.
  • have a listening vocabulary that includes some general academic words and some specialised words.

Listeners have a vocabulary that includes some general academic words (see Further Information) and some specialised words. Areas of study can include listening for and discussing:

  • academic words and phrases, such as explain, describe, compare, multiply, divide and common denominator
  • specialised words and terms, which may be those heard in a work setting (for example, forklift, washer, sprinkler system and mains pressure).

Building on prior knowledge

Learners use prior knowledge before, during and after listening to help them focus on and understand the talk.

Listening for details

Learners listen for details in specific situations (such as passing on messages), and communicate those details to others.

Listening for vocabulary

Learners are taught to listen for specific words, using strategies such as prior knowledge and the context to work out the meanings of these words.

Recognising the impact of words

Learners explore the ways in which words work together to develop an understanding of collocations, denotations and connotations.

Sequencing a process

Learners are taught strategies to get the gist as they listen and to determine the order or sequence of steps in a process.

Taking turns

Learners explore the many ways in which participants in a conversation give and use cues for taking turns.

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6.
  • have a listening vocabulary that includes many general academic words and specialised words
  • understand when a speaker uses more complex figurative language, for example, by talking about the Earth as if it were a woman (personification)
  • understand when a speaker uses, for effect, words that have particular connotations.

Listeners have a wide and rapidly expanding listening vocabulary that includes many general academic words and specialised words, including acronyms. (Specialised words include words and acronyms that are heard most often in a specific area of work or study, such as photosynthesis, compliance, DOC, TPK and GST.) Listeners can understand why speakers choose to use various kinds of figurative language and words (such as harassment or gentleman) that have particular connotations. Areas of study can include:

  • listening for and discussing the use of figurative language in radio and television reports or programmes
  • a sentence-by-sentence analysis of a recorded talk or lecture.

Building on prior knowledge

Learners use prior knowledge before, during and after listening to help them focus on and understand the talk.

Recognising the impact of words

Learners explore the ways in which words work together to develop an understanding of collocations, denotations and connotations.

Sequencing a process

Learners are taught strategies to get the gist as they listen and to determine the order or sequence of steps in a process.

Taking turns

Learners explore the many ways in which participants in a conversation give and use cues for taking turns.

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